Cities in The Italian Expressions

Do you enjoy some colorful Italian expressions?

Italians are very proud of the city they are from and sometimes they joke at other cities using some typical Italian expressions.

For example, people from Genova are considered stingy or people from Milan snobbish.

There are also expressions used in the everyday language that refer to different cities and have a specific meaning for Italian people.

So let’s see some of these typical ways to say!

The expression “andare a Canossa” (“going to Canossa“) means to humiliate yourself, to admit to be wrong.

This way to say comes from the Italian history.

In 1077  emperor Henry IV, with the help of Matilde of Canossa, went to Canossa to meet pope Gregory VII to ask him to revocate the excommunication.

He had to humiliate himself on his knees for three days and three nights before the Pope decided to open the gate of the castle.

Casalinga di Voghera” (“housewife of Voghera“) is an expression used to talk about the middle class, usually uneducated and humble.

Nevertheless this way to say is not meant to be derogatory.

An expression that kids really like is “chi va a Roma perde la potrona” (“who goes to Rome loses his armchair“).

In Italian the word “armchair” means job role as well.

This way to say comes from the idea that if you leave your job in a city to go to Rome (Italy’s capital city) for a better position, someone else will have your old job and you will lose it forever.

Another common expression is “tutte le strade portano a Roma” (“all roads lead to Rome“).

The ancient city of Rome had a great streets’ system and a lot of consular streets of the Roman period still exist…and all of them lead you to Rome!

Milano da bere” (“Milan to drink”) is a journalistic expression, that means classy Milan.

This way to say was first invented for an italian TV commercial for a liqueur that showed several pictures of a common day in Milan.

So, do you have any similar ways to say in your language?

Let us know the funniest!

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