Italian idiomatic expression

What Avere La Botte Piena e La Moglie Ubriaca Means In Italian

Do you want to learn a really funny Italian idiom? If you have never heard the Italian idiom “Avere la botte piena e la moglie ubriaca“, it’s definitely time to learn it! Italians love using these nice expressions and we are pretty sure you are quite fascinated by them: idioms reveal an important side of […]

Italian idiomatic expression

What does “Non avere peli sulla lingua” mean in Italian?

Have you heard of the idiom “Non avere peli sulla lingua” while learning Italian in London? Do you know what it means? The literal translation is: “Not to have hairs on your tongue”. If you’re just starting out in Italian, you may be very confused when hearing this phrase! What does it mean to have hairs […]

Italian idiomatic expression

What Sbarcare Il Lunario Means In Italian

Are you taking individual Italian classes in London and coming across lovely Italian idioms? Well, I bet your individual Italian classes in London are just amazing: going through the Italian language and culture exposes you to several expressions used in the everyday language. In Italy people love Idiomatic expressions: they summarize meanings that you can’t […]

Italian idiomatic expression

What Non Ci Piove Means In Italian

Have you just come across “Non ci piove“, one of the most common Italian idioms? It is a very nice expression and I reckon you heard it at least once! The literal meaning of this idiom is “it doesn’t rain on it“, which is as to say “no doubts about it“: so we can use […]

Italian idiomatic expression

What Tagliare La Testa Al Toro Means In Italian

If you need to make a decision and sort something out once and for all, this nice Italian idiom is perfect for you! “Tagliare la testa al toro” literally means “to cut off the head of the bull“: how is that related to decision making then? The story behind this idiomatic expression is very useful […]

Italian idiomatic expression

What Essere Al Verde Means in Italian

You probably heard someone using the Italian idiomatic expression “Sono al verde!” and tried to translate wondering what “To be at the green” might mean. Well, “essere al verde” is a very common idiom which means “to be out of money“, even though you would be more likely to associate that expression to the red […]

Italian idiomatic expression

What L’Abito Non Fa Il Monaco Means in Italian

When you want to say that it is not possible to judge someone solely by his appearance, in Italian you can say “l’abito non fa il monaco!”. This nice Italian idiomatic expression literally means that “the dress does not make the monk”, which in English would be “clothes don’t make the man”. Here you have […]

Italian idiomatic expression

What Tutto Fa Brodo Means In Italian

In Italy, if you get a little discount, you can definitely use the Italian idiomatic expression “Tutto fa brodo!“. If you translate it literally it means “everything makes broth” but obviously isn’t a cooking reference: its meaning is similar to “it’s all grist to the mill“, so it is a nice idiom to say that […]

Italian idiomatic expression

What Stare Con Le Mani In Mano Means in Italian

As you probably know, Italians can’t avoid expressing themselves with meaningful gestures: that is why they use the expression “stare con le mani in mano“, which literally means “to be with your hands in your hands“, with a negative meaning similar to the English “to sit on your hands“. This way to say is used […]

Italian idiomatic expression

What Avere La Coda Di Paglia Means in Italian

If you committed something wrong or a little transgression and fear that someone uncovers it, in Italian we would use a popular idiomatic expression and say that “hai la coda di paglia“! Avere la coda di paglia is an Italian way to say used when someone has a guilty conscience, but in a friendly way. […]