Tigella: A Traditional Italian Food

Do you like tigella as much as we do?

If you have ever been to Emilia Romagna, in the North of Italy, you must have tried the famous tigella.

The tigella is a small, round type of bread (10-12cm diameter, 1cm thickness) which comes from the area between Modena and Bologna.

If you travel in that area you can notice that the same product is called in different ways depending on the city: in Bologna it is called tigella whereas in Modena it is called crescentina, but if you order it you realize that it is exactly the same.

Let’s find out more about it!

This fantastic little focaccia is named after the tools used by the Romans to bake the tigelle: disks made of clay and decorated with stars, circles or other patterns in low relief.

The dough made with flour, water, milk, lard and yeast, was put between the disks, wrapped with chestnut leaves and baked in the fireplace, under the ash.  Many disks were usually made very hot, and piled up in order to bake a good number of tigelle at the same time.

discover tigella from Emilia Romagna

 

Normally people eat tigelle still hot, filled with cured meat, different types of cheese or with the traditional pesto called cunza made of lard, garlic and rosemary mashed together to obtain a thick spread to fill the tigella adding grated parmesan on top.

When you will be able to travel around Emilia Romagna and try the best tigelle ever, here you have two fantastic traditional restaurant you can’t miss:

  • in Bologna, the Chiosco ai Pini is a must: just outside the historic centre of the city, surrounded by a quiet park, this typical restaurant is the perfect place to taste home made tigelle served with a rich board of cheeses, cured meat and several spreads, salty and sweet.
  • in Modena, in the city centre, the Trattoria Il Fantino offers all the best of the regional cuisine, especially the traditional hand made tigelle accompanied with great wines.

For now, why don’t you make some tigelle at home? Try this recipe!

Enjoy!

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